Is Hungary afraid of the past?

by Taaha Malik and Trevor Taylor

In the aftermath of WWII, Hungary, left with a legacy of ties to the Nazis, formed an alliance with the Soviet Union. By 1949, Hungary had drafted a new constitution, making the nation a “workers and peasants’ state,” resulting in, among other things, a wave of police terror against all opponents of the new regime. With the help of the Soviet Union, the Hungarian Communists effectively purged the judicial body and other civil services, and <Read More>


International Justice in Africa

by Lauren Scott

On May 30, 2016 the Extraordinary African Chambers (“EAC”) issued a verdict in the Hissène Habré (“Habré”) trial. The significance of this verdict and of the trial itself will indeed be “extraordinary” for international justice. As a former head of State charged with war crimes, crimes against humanity and torture, Habré’s trial was the first time that international justice had played out on the African continent. Africa, long bemoaned as the opportunistic target of International Criminal Court (“ICC”) <Read More>


A Hazy Memory in Poland

by Taaha Malik and Trevor Taylor

Poland has historically been the epicenter of various conflicts and disputes, and is certainly no stranger to global adversity. From years of subjugation at the hands the Russian Empire, to being the victim of Hitler’s first major conquest in Europe at the outbreak of World War II, Poland knows what it means to struggle for liberty, equality, and a fair position in the global arena. It is precisely because of these <Read More>


Revisiting the Arab Spring: Justice in Times of Transition

Mr. Habib Nassar, a prominent human rights attorney and transitional justice advocate with 10 years of experience in the Middle East and in North Africa, visited New York Law School on February 28th, 2013 to discuss the political conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa and the evolving trends of transitional justice resulting from these conflicts.